Why Dental Work isn’t Covered by Medical Insurance

dentist-home3NBC’s Nicola Spector takes a look at why dental work is not covered under medical insurance. She notes modern dentistry’s roots are in the barbershop rather than more traditional medical practice. Until the nineteenth century, dentistry was practiced in the same chair in which men got their hair cut and their beards trimmed. Dr. Gary Glassman, an endodontist based in Toronto, Canada who also practices in the U.S., says such divergence between dental and medical is not helpful because “oral health is directly related to general health . . . The oral cavity is a gateway to your body. A lot of stuff in the mouth can indicate kidney disease, heart disease, diabetes, HPV, cancer, etc. Your dentist can be your first line of defense.”

Meanwhile, Dr. Adam C. Powell, president of healthcare-focused management advisory and operational consulting firm Payer+Provider Syndicate, notes that “Dental insurance, unlike medical, is not regulated and it tends to be very constrained . . . The annual maximum benefit is not that high, and there’s usually some sort of deductible.”

Read more at NBC News

What are the Tax Ramifications of Selling Rental Real Estate?

the dealAs with any significant transaction, the sale of rental real estate will have income-tax consequences you’ll want to understand ahead of time. It’s good to have a real estate CPA on your side when navigating this sale.

Although much will depend on the details of your specific situation, here are some key concepts to keep in mind.

Gain or Loss?

Figuring gain or loss for tax purposes involves comparing the amount realized on the sale to your “adjusted basis” in the property. Generally, your adjusted basis is equal to the amount you paid for the property, plus the cost of any improvements you made and minus depreciation deductions.

The tax law requires you to net your gains and losses from the sale of rental and business property held longer than one year against each other. If the result is a net gain, it generally will be taxed as long-term capital gain, except to the extent that special rules regarding prior depreciation and losses can result in less favorable treatment. If the netting process results in a net loss, you may deduct it in full against your ordinary income.

Potential Tax Benefit

You may have losses from renting the property that you weren’t allowed to deduct in previous years because of the “passive loss” rules. Those suspended losses generally will be deductible in the year you sell your rental property.

Contact us today for more tips on selling rental real estate at our Orange County, CA CPA Firm. Or, call us today at 949-759-5626

How to Improve Cash Flow For Your Business

Hand put coin to moneySlow paying customers, seasonal revenue variations, an unexpected downturn in sales, higher expenses — any number of business conditions can contribute to a cash flow crunch. If you own a small business, you may find the suggestions that follow helpful in minimizing cash flow problems.

Billing and collections

Your employees need to work with clear guidelines. If you don’t have a standardized process for billing and collections, make it a priority to develop one. Consider sending invoices electronically instead of by mail. And encourage customers to pay via electronic funds transfer rather than by check. If you don’t offer a discount for timely payment, consider adding one to your payment terms.

Expense management.

Know when bills are due. As often as possible, pay suppliers within the period that allows you to take advantage of any prompt-payment incentives. Remember that foregoing a discount in order to pay later is essentially financing your purchase.

Take another look at your costs for ongoing goods and services, including telecommunications, shipping and delivery, utilities, etc. If you or your employees travel frequently for in-person meetings, consider holding more web conferences to reduce costs.

Inventory

Focus on inventory management, if applicable, to avoid tying up cash unnecessarily. Determine the minimum quantities you need to keep on hand to promptly serve customers. Systematically track inventory levels to avoid overbuying.

Debt management

Consider how you use credit. Before you commit to financing, compare terms from more than one lender and keep the amount to a manageable level. For flexibility, consider establishing a line of credit if you do not already have one. You will be charged interest only on the amount drawn from the credit line.

Control taxes

Make sure you are taking advantage of available tax breaks, such as the Section 179 deduction for equipment purchases, to limit taxes.

Develop a cash flow budget

Projecting monthly or weekly cash inflows and outflows gives you a critical snapshot of your business’s cash position and shows whether you’ll have enough cash on hand to meet your company’s needs.

Don’t get left behind. Contact us today at 949-759-5626 to discover how we can help you keep your business on the right track. Don’t wait, contact our Orange County CPA Firm.

What are the Tax Advantages of Being a Landlord?

Woman inspecting house interior
Owning rental property can bring in extra income, but it’s not without its downsides. If the furnace breaks or a pipe bursts, you can be sure you’ll get the call — sometimes in the middle of the night. But for all the hassles being a landlord can bring, there are some bright spots. One of them is the ability to deduct certain expenses from your total rental income on your tax return.

Owning a rental home, apartment, or other residential property may entitle you to take some or all of the following deductions.

House Calls

Real estate taxes and mortgage interest on rental property are potentially deductible, as are fire, flood, theft, and liability insurance premiums. Services, such as lawn care, performed on the rental property and any wages you pay employees in connection with the rental activity may be deductible as well.

Wanted: Tenants

You can deduct expenses associated with renting the property, including management fees, commissions, and cleaning and maintenance.

This Old House

The costs of repairs that keep the property in good condition, such as painting, are deductible in the year you incur them.

Cost Recovery

You generally can begin claiming deductions for depreciation on rental property in the year the property is ready and available for rent. In addition, you can recover the cost of improvements that add value to your property, such as replacing the roof or adding a deck, by claiming depreciation over time.

Over the River, Through the Woods

You may be able to deduct the expenses of traveling to your property when the main purpose of your visit is to collect rental income or to manage and maintain the property.

It’s important to keep complete and accurate records of all expenses related to your rental property. Keep in mind that there are tax law limits on deducting losses from rental activities.

Don’t deal with tax issues on your own. Call us right now at 949-759-5626 to find out how we can provide you with the answers you need. Or, learn more about our real estate CPA accounting services on our website.

As an S Corporation Shareholder do You Need to Worry about Taxes?

S corporation shareholders have extra reason to worry about their company’s annual performance: It has a direct impact on their own income taxes.

How It Works

Unlike a regular C corporation, an S corporation usually doesn’t pay federal income taxes itself. Instead, each shareholder is allocated a portion of the corporate income, loss, deductions, and credits on a special “K-1″ tax form. The shareholder then must report the items listed on the K-1 on his or her personal tax return.

The K-1 allocations are based on stock ownership percentages. So, for example, if an S corporation has $100,000 of taxable business income for the year, a person who owns 75% of the stock in the corporation would be allocated 75% of that income, or $75,000.

This scheme can get complicated. Case in point: The K-1 may show more income than the shareholder actually received from the company during the year. That’s because the K-1 figure is based on the corporation’s actual taxable income — not on the distributions made to the shareholder.

Example. Tom starts a new corporation, electing S status. In the first year, Tom draws a $30,000 salary and receives no other distributions from the company. The company’s ordinary business income (after deducting his salary) is $10,000. Since Tom is the only shareholder, all the company’s $10,000 of income is allocated to him on his K-1. Tom must include both the $30,000 of salary and the $10,000 on his personal income-tax return, even though all he actually received from the corporation was his salary.

This result seems harsh, but it’s not the end of the story. Special rules in the tax law prevent the same income from being taxed again. Essentially, Tom will be credited with already having paid taxes on the $10,000 so that any future distribution of the funds will not be taxable.

Tracking Basis

To determine whether non-dividend distributions* are tax free, S corporation shareholders must keep track of their stock basis. The computation generally starts with a shareholder’s initial capital contribution (or the stock’s cost if it was purchased) and changes from year to year as the shareholder is allocated corporate income, loss, etc. Non-dividend distributions that don’t exceed a shareholder’s stock basis are tax free.

Don’t deal with tax issues on your own. Call us right now to find out how we can provide you with the answers you need.

* Most distributions made from an S corporation are non-dividend distributions. Dividend distributions can occur if the company was previously a regular C corporation (or in other limited situations).

Business Start-up Costs — What’s Deductible?

Start UpLaunching a new business takes hard work — and money. Costs for market surveys, travel to line up potential distributors and suppliers, advertising, hiring employees, training, and other expenses incurred before a business is officially launched can add up to a substantial amount.

The tax law places certain limitations on tax deductions for start-up expenses.

  • No deduction is available until the business becomes active.
  • Up to $5,000 of accumulated start-up expenses may be deducted in the tax year in which the active business begins. This $5,000 limit is reduced (but not below zero) by the excess of total start-up costs over $50,000.
  • Any remaining start-up expenses may be deducted ratably over the 180-month period beginning with the month in which the active business begins.

Example. Gina spent $20,000 on start-up costs before her new business began on July 1, 2015. In 2015, she may deduct $5,000 and the portion of the remaining $15,000 allocable to July through December of 2015 ($15,000/180 × 6 = $500), a total of $5,500. The remaining $14,500 may be deducted ratably over the remaining 174 months.

 

Instead of deducting start-up costs, a business may elect to capitalize them (treat them as an asset on the balance sheet). Deductions for “organization expenses” — such as legal and accounting fees for services related to forming a corporation or partnership — are subject to similar rules.

If you want to be more aggressive lowering your tax obligations but stay within the legal limits, call 949-759-5626 and ask for Jerry Morey.

 

Morey & Associates is a Southern California CPA Accounting Firm with offices in Newport Beach and San Clemente CA.  Our clients are located throughout Los Angeles and Orange County.

 

Real Estate Gains – Property Exchange Can Defer Taxes

Commercial PropertyIf you are fortunate enough to own real estate that has appreciated substantially, you may be hesitant to sell the property and reinvest in another property because of the taxes you’d have to pay on your profit. Instead of selling, you might want to consider a “like-kind exchange.”

A like-kind exchange is a property swap. When all tax law requirements are met, a like-kind exchange allows you to defer your gain for tax purposes.

An Example

Pete exchanges a tract of land worth $500,000 for a building, also appraised at $500,000. He originally paid $300,000 for the land and he made no improvements to it. Because the deal is structured as a like-kind exchange, Pete’s $200,000 gain on the land ($500,000 value minus $300,000 cost) is tax deferred.

Tax deferred doesn’t mean tax free. For tax purposes, Pete’s cost basis in the building he acquired in the exchange is $300,000, the same as his cost basis in the land he gave up. So, if Pete were to turn around and sell the building for $500,000, he’d have to report a taxable gain of $200,000 at that time.

Which Assets Qualify?

The like-kind exchange strategy is available for investment property and property used in a trade or business. Real estate has to be exchanged for real estate, and personal property for personal property. Inventory and shares of stock aren’t eligible for like-kind exchange treatment, and various other restrictions apply.

Making a Deal

A like-kind exchange can be accomplished when properties are not of equal value. Typically, the owner of the less valuable property turns over enough cash (or other assets) to even out the exchange. Or one owner might agree to assume the other’s debt. Note that transactions involving cash, additional assets, and debt relief are not completely tax deferred.
Other variations on the basic like-kind exchange are possible. For example, it’s possible to structure an exchange that isn’t simultaneous. Or more than two property owners can be involved in the deal.

In the right situation, a like-kind exchange can be a significant tax-saving opportunity. We’d be happy to discuss it with you.

If you would like to learn more, call 949-759-5626 and ask for Jerry Morey.

 

Morey & Associates is a California CPA Firm providing real estate accounting throughout Los Angeles and Orange County. Our founder has been licensed in California for over twenty years and we work with Real Estate Investement Trusts (REIT), Property Management companies, Real Estate Developers and Investment Groups, and Owner Operators.

Don’t Let Taxes Trip You Up

The last thing you need as a small business owner is to have to spend time unraveling tax problems you could have avoided. There are many tax issues that can trip up small business owners — here are a few.

Mixing Business and Personal

Keeping your personal bank and credit card accounts separate from your business accounts isn’t always easy. But “commingling” business and personal accounts creates a recordkeeping nightmare. When it’s tax time, you may not be able to identify all the appropriate business expenses. As a result, it could be difficult to accurately determine your business income and you might lose deductions.

Not Keeping Track

Keeping track of business expenses can be a challenge. However, you’ll need proof of purchase for any expenses you plan to deduct. Proof can be a canceled check (or legible image of the check) or a credit card, debit card, or electronic funds transfer (EFT) statement showing the payee, the amount of the purchase or transfer, and the transaction date.

You’ll also need an invoice or a receipt identifying the purchase. If the business purpose for the purchase isn’t immediately obvious, attaching a note of explanation or writing directly on the invoice or receipt can save time later should questions arise. There are specific substantiation requirements for business travel and entertainment expenses. Check with us if you have questions.

Making the IRS Wait

The employment taxes you collect should always be remitted to the IRS in a timely manner — without exception. As an employer, you’re responsible for withholding federal income tax and FICA (Social Security and Medicare) taxes from your employees’ wages and remitting them, along with your company’s FICA contributions, to the IRS. Penalties for noncompliance can be harsh.

Misclassifying Workers

Misclassifying workers as independent contractors when they are actually employees can be a thorny issue because they are treated differently for income-tax withholding and employment-tax purposes.

 

> Employees: You must withhold federal income tax and FICA taxes, pay your share of FICA taxes, and pay unemployment taxes.

> Independent contractors: You’re not required to withhold income tax, and the worker is fully liable for his or her own self-employment taxes. FICA and unemployment taxes do not apply.

 

It’s important to get it right to avoid penalties. Generally, the more control you have, the more likely it is that the worker is an employee.

 

Taxing Decisions for Orange County Residents

Do you use your car for business driving or maintain an office in your home? In either situation, you may have a choice of methods for figuring your tax deduction.

Car Expenses

When you use your car for both business and personal purposes, you have to keep track of your mileage so that your car expenses may be divided between the two purposes. Only the business portion is deductible. That much is a given. The choice involves whether to use the actual amounts you spend on gas, oil, repairs, insurance, etc., to figure your deduction or the IRS standard mileage rate. Usually, you will want to use actual expenses if it produces a larger deduction. But, if keeping receipts is a burden, the simpler standard mileage rate may be best. (Requirements apply.)

Home Office Expenses

There are strict requirements for claiming the home office deduction, but it can be a tax saver if you qualify for it. Assuming you do, you’ll have to decide between deducting actual expenses allocated to the home office (usually based on square footage) or using a simplified method (deducting $5 per square foot for up to 300 square feet of office space). Again, you will usually want to use the actual expense method if it produces a larger deduction. But, if you want to minimize recordkeeping and don’t want tax complications when you sell your home, you may lean toward the simplified method.*

 

If you want to be more aggressive lowering your tax obligations but stay within the legal limits, call 949-759-5626 and ask for Jerry Morey.

 

Morey & Associates is a Southern California CPA Accounting Firm with offices in Newport Beach and San Clemente CA.  Our clients are located throughout Los Angeles and Orange County.

 

 

* Capital gain attributable to depreciation of your home will be taxable. Unlike with the actual expense method, there is no depreciation claimed when using the simplified method.

Lock In Tax Breaks You Deserve

Tax BreaksIf you run a small business, you already have a full plate. The last thing you need is for the IRS to question any of your business expense deductions. But it could happen. And that’s why having records that prove your expenses is so important. Even deductions for routine business expenses could be disallowed if you don’t have appropriate records.

What Records Are Required?

Except in a few instances, the tax law does not require any special kind of records. You’re free to have a recordkeeping system that is suited to your business, as long as it clearly shows your expenses. In addition to books that allow you to track and summarize your business transactions, you should keep supporting documents, such as:

  • Canceled checks
  • Cash register receipts
  • Credit card sales slips
  • Invoices
  • Account statements

The rules are stricter for travel, entertainment, and transportation expenses. You should retain hotel bills or other documentary evidence (e.g., receipts, canceled checks) for each lodging expense and for any other expense of $75 or more. In addition, you should maintain a diary, log, or account book with the information described below.

Travel. Your records should show the cost of each separate expense for travel, lodging, and meals. For each trip, record your destination, the dates you left and returned, and the number of days spent on business. Also record the business purpose for the expense or the business benefit you gained or expected to gain. Incidental expenses, such as taxi fares, may be totaled in reasonable categories.

Entertainment. Record the date the entertainment took place and the amount of each separate expense, along with the name and address or location of the place of entertainment. Note the business purpose for the expense or the business benefit you gained or expected to gain and the nature of any business discussion or activity that took place. Also list the identities and occupations of the individuals you were entertaining or other information that indicates their business relationship to you.

If the entertainment was directly before or after a business discussion, be sure to indicate the date, place, nature, and duration of the discussion and the individuals who took part in both the discussion and the entertainment activity. For a business meal, you must prove that either you or your employee was present.

Transportation. As with travel and entertainment, you should record the amount and date of each separate expense. Note your business destination and the business purpose for the expense. If you are deducting actual car expenses, you’ll need to record the cost of the car and the date you started using it for business (for depreciation purposes). If you drive the car for both business and personal purposes or claim the standard mileage rate, keep records of the mileage for each business use and the total miles driven during the year.

Don’t Mix Business and Personal Expenses

Things can get tangled if you intermingle business and personal expenses. You can avoid headaches by having a separate business bank account and credit card.

If you want to be more aggressive lowering your tax obligations but stay within the legal limits, call 949-759-5626 and ask for Jerry Morey.

 

Morey & Associates is a Southern California CPA Accounting Firm with offices in Newport Beach and San Clemente CA.  Our clients are located throughout Los Angeles and Orange County.